Federal Tax Crimes

Latest from Federal Tax Crimes

Readers of this blog are aware of the major investigation and related articles about the “Pandora Papers.”  The Pandora Papers leaks arise from an investigation by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (“ICIJ”), here, which previously disclosed the Panama Papers.  The ICIJ page on the Pandora Papers is here.I have not written on the Pandora Papers because the

Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (“TRAC”) has a new report titled Equal Justice and Sentencing Practices Among Federal District Court Judges, here.  The email I received with a summary of the report was titled:  “The Impact of the Identity of the Judge on Sentencing.” TRAC gathers and maintains a lot of data and ways to access and analyze data at

DOJ Tax issued this press release today: Indictment Unsealed Against Six Individuals and Foreign Financial Service Firm for Tax Evasion Conspiracy: Defendants Allegedly Used ‘Singapore Solution’ to Enable U.S. Clients to Evade Taxes on Over $60 Million Hidden Offshore, here.  In a related action, the press release states that another person pled guilty to one count of tax evasion. 

DOJ Tax announced here the indictment of Mark Anthony Gyetvay.  Basically, as  I  understand  it on  quick review, Gytevay made  mega million in Russian related adventures and failed to (i)  pay tax and (ii) file appropriate FBARs.  A fair inference on the facts claimed in the  Press Release (and presumably the indictment) is that those failures were willful.  Then, Gyetvay

In United States v. Pursley (on appeal to CA 5, Dkt. No. 20-20454), Pursley was convicted of 1 count of conspiracy related to tax and three counts of tax evasion, two for Pursley’s taxes and one for the taxes of another.  See the judgment here.  Pursley was a lawyer in Houston who enabled tax evasion by a client by

In In re Grand Jury, Nos. 21-55085 & 21-55145 (9th Cir. 9/13/21), CA 9 here, the Court held that the “because of” test imported from the work-product context did not apply to the attorney-client privilege and instead applied a predominant purpose test for dual-purpose communications.  The opinion is short (14 pages) and the summary offered by the Court is good,