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Image by mohamed Hassan from Pixabay In addition to turning the world upside down, COVID-19 has certainly created an environment conducive to scammers. Ranging from fake treatments and tests to undelivered goods, the early days of the pandemic provided scammers an opportunity to exploit people’s fears and uncertainty and their efforts to keep themselves and their families safe from this new virus. As the days of the pandemic continued to keep people indoors and in their virtual environments, the scams continued as well. Soon, we were reading about attempts to separate Americans from their economic stimulus checks and…
2021 marks 10 years since Star Wars Day had its first organized celebration in Toronto on May 4, 2011, although sticklers might argue its actual 10th Anniversary will occur in 2023, as “In late 2012, Disney purchased Lucasfilm and has officially observed the holiday at Disneyland and Walt Disney World ever since.” (To the non-geeks reading this, May 4 was chosen for Star Wars Day as a “pun on the catchphrase ‘May the Force be with you’ as ‘May the Fourth be with you.’”) Instead of a recitation and summary of the “Top 5 Star
May is designated as Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month in the US, and this blog post provides an overview of its history, the theme for 2021, and activities and events to commemorate “the contributions that generations of AAPIs have made to American history, society, and culture.” History In 1978, Congress passed a joint resolution that became Pub.L.95-419, and “directed the President to issue a proclamation designating the week beginning on May 4, 1979 as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week.” The observance was extended from one week to one month in 1990, and…
A name is the blueprint of the thing we call character. You ask, “What’s in a name?” I answer, “Just about everything you do.” – Morris Mandel Photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash It’s a curious thing when you call a locksmith and learn that his name is Mr. Key, you see a podiatrist whose name is Dr. Foote, and you hire an arborist, Mr. Forrest, to trim your trees. Who could possibly be better suited to these specific tasks than those named – and seemingly destined – to perform them? Early names were purposely chosen to match one’s occupation…
“Eight hundred miles to El Paso from the state line…” Last week, the Texas House of Representatives passed a bill to authorize the establishment of two new public law schools along the state’s southern border, one in El Paso, the other in the Rio Grande Valley. Any of Texas’s current universities can propose a law school in either (or both) location, with observers expecting University of Texas Rio Grande Valley and University of Texas El Paso to be the most likely candidates due to proximity. Texas currently has ten law schools, half of which are public. Though Texas has the
Image: Courtesy of the American Bar Association On March 3, the American Bar Association (ABA) kicked off its annual Law Day celebration with a livestream broadcast during which ABA President Patricia Refo introduced this year’s theme and highlighted some suitable programming options. Law Day, a national day set aside to celebrate the legal system, its contribution to American governance, and the rights and freedoms it has engendered, has been celebrated annually since 1961 when Congress passed a joint resolution designating May 1 as Law Day, U.S.A. To help cultivate an appreciation and understanding of the law and all that it…
You may be familiar with the increasingly popular celebration of linguistic shenanigans known as International Talk Like a Pirate Day, which takes place annually on September 19th. Did you know, however, that, based on the widespread appeal of that day’s linguistic frivolity, the Chicago Shakespeare Theater created a similar day of fun called National Talk Like Shakespeare Day? Celebrated each year on the Bard’s birthday, April 23rd, it’s an occasion for commemorating Early Modern English expression. It’s also a fun opportunity to honor the life and language of perhaps the most famous poet and playwright in the history…
With less than two months remaining in the current Texas legislative session, the capitol in Austin has been buzzing. To keep up with this flurry of activity, you can turn to reports from various news outlets or legislative tracking services. As librarians, however, we would be remiss in our information-providing duties if we failed to mention the benefits of using Texas Legislature Online (TLO), the official website of the Texas legislature. TLO not only allows users to track current legislation as it winds its way through the House and the Senate but also research past bills and legislation. Moreover, users…
Sit back, relax, and get frumpertable. Today is National Wear Your Pajamas to Work Day! In the age of COVID-19, when your kitchen table is your home office, and your webcam is your window to the world, showing up to work in your favorite jammies doesn’t feel very novel. Typically, however, April 16th is a day for getting comfy. One day after our (traditional) federal tax filing deadline, a little comfort is what we all need. Created by an online pajama retailer, National Wear Your Pajamas to Work Day has not been widely adopted, but, at this topsy-turvy…
Image by Alexandra_Koch from Pixabay As vaccination efforts against COVID-19 improve across the country and conversations focus on returning to the workplace, questions have emerged as to whether employers can require its employees to get vaccinated prior to going back. Employers are placed in the position of balancing the general health, safety, and welfare of its employees with the rights provided under various federal statutes. To encourage as many employees as possible to get vaccinated, many employers, especially those in the retail and food service sectors, are offering incentives to those employees willing to get the jab of the needle.