Willis Law Firm

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Working at ports, terminals and docks can be dangerous. From slip hazards to inexperienced coworkers, and from defective tools and equipment to unmaintained boats and ships, there are numerous issues that can lead to on-the-job injuries for port, terminal and dock workers in Wisconsin. If you have been injured on the job, you will need to determine what type of claim you can file, and it will be important for you to speak with a maritime accident attorney about your legal rights. Seeking Workers Comp as a Port, Terminal or Dock Worker in Wisconsin As a port, terminal or dock…
If you work on an oil rig, platform or other fixed structure offshore, recovering your losses after an on-the-job injury will probably involve filing a claim under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA). In this article, offshore accident lawyer David Willis explains what you need to know about your legal rights under the OCSLA. Who is Eligible to File a Claim Under the OCSLA? The OCSLA applies to offshore employees who work on rigs, platforms and other structures affixed to the outer continental shelf. It also applies to many offshore pipeline workers. In most areas around the United States,…
If you live in North Carolina and work offshore, you probably are not eligible for benefits under the state’s workers’ compensation law. However, you may be eligible for other types of benefits. Two federal laws – the Jones Act and the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA) – protect offshore workers who get injured on the job. A maritime injury attorney can assess your rights under these laws and help you collect the benefits you deserve. Understanding Your Rights as an Offshore Worker in North Carolina Lots of North Carolina residents work offshore. Whether you fish for a living, run…
The Charleston Harbor on South Carolina’s coast is currently one of the busiest harbors in the country. The South Carolina Ports harbor deepening project has dredging ships in the harbor almost every day, and barges are a constant presence as dredging material needs to be carried away in order to reach the 48-foot final depth leading up to the North Charleston Terminal. While this means that there are currently lots of job opportunities in Charleston, it also means that the risk for workers in the Charleston Harbor is higher than usual. If you have been injured working in the Charleston…
In 1970, Congress enacted the Jones Act to protect inland and offshore workers who do not qualify for state workers’ compensation benefits. The Jones Act provides “maintenance and cure” benefits to injured seamen regardless of who is to blame for their injuries, and it allows injured seamen to seek additional compensation for “Jones Act negligence” and “unseaworthiness.”  If you live in Georgia and work inland on one of the state’s many rivers, at the Port of Brunswick or Port of Savannah on the Atlantic Coast, or out in the open water, there is a very good chance that the Jones…
Barges are popular flat-bottomed vessels that were built mostly for the transportation of bulk goods, cargo, and sometimes passengers via rivers and canals. Millions of Americans work aboard barges or other vessels each year. Barge work can be dangerous. Unfortunately, sometimes barge workers are hurt during the course and scope of their employment in the barge industry. Texas barge workers injured while working should contact a Texas Barge Accident Lawyer immediately for guidance on their case. Accidents Facing Texas Maritime Workers Working on Barges Sometimes workers aboard barges are injured from malfunctions such as an engine breakdown which can cause…
Texas Tugboat Accident Lawyer for Injured Seaman  Maritime work, such as work performed aboard a tugboat, is one of the most dangerous industries to work in. In fact, according to the National Institute for Occupational and Health (NIOSH), from 2011-2017, fatal injuries for maritime workers in marine ports and terminals in the United States occurred at a rate five times that of the U.S. workforce overall. Nonfatal injuries and illnesses during that same time period were nearly double that of the U.S. workforce overall.  Work performed aboard a tugboat involves the towing or tugging of large vessels which can be…
If you qualify for benefits under the Longshore and Harbor Workers Compensation Act (LHWCA), you will need to file your claim using the U.S. Department of Labor Form LS-203. You must complete the form to the best of your ability, and omitting any information could lead to your claim being denied. While you can file Form LS-203 on your own, you can also hire a maritime injury lawyer to help you. This is the best option for many workers, as completing the form and securing benefits can often prove to be a challenge. Information Required for Longshore and Harbor Workers…
If you live in Alabama and work offshore in the Gulf of Mexico, your legal rights after an accident will depend on how, where and why the accident happened. Depending on the circumstances involved, you may be limited to seeking “no-fault” maintenance and cure benefits under the Jones Act, or you may be able to recover full compensation by filing a claim under the Jones Act or other law. Regardless of your rights, it will be important to seek help, and you should consult with an offshore accident lawyer promptly. Your Rights Under the Jones Act If you qualify as…
If you work in the maritime industry but do not work offshore, recovering compensation after an on-the-job accident may involve filing a claim under the Longshore and Harbor Workers Compensation Act (LHWCA). Here, maritime accident attorney David Willis answers some frequently asked questions (FAQs) about compensation claims under the LHWCA: Am I Eligible to For Compensation Under the Longshore and Harbor Workers Compensation Act? In order to be eligible for compensation under the LHWCA, you must qualify as a longshore or harbor “employee.” Those who are covered under the LHWCA include: Longshoremen Harbor workers Shipbuilders and repairmen Shipbreakers Other employees…